Category Archives: Mass and Balance

Mass and Balance

To calculate the allowable take-off mass, the factors to be taken into account include:

A: the sum of the Maximum Landing Mass and the fuel on board at take-off.
B: the sum of the Maximum Landing Mass and the trip fuel.
C: the sum of the Maximum Zero Fuel Mass and the trip fuel.
D: the Maximum Take-off Mass minus the trip fuel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: B

What determines the longitudinal stability of an aeroplane ?

A: The effectiveness of the horizontal stabilizer, rudder and rudder trim tab.
B: The location of the centre of gravity with respect to the neutral point.
C: The relationship of thrust and lift to weight and drag.
D: The dihedral, angle of sweepback and the keel effect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: B

A revenue flight is to be made by a jet transport. The following are the aeroplane’s structural limits:

Maximum Ramp Mass: 69 900 kg
Maximum Take Off Mass: 69 300 kg
Maximum Landing Mass: 58 900 kg
Maximum Zero Fuel Mass: 52 740 kg.
The performance limited take off mass is 67 450kg and the performance limited landing mass is 55 470 kg.
Dry Operating Mass: 34 900 kg.
Trip Fuel: 6 200 kg.
Taxi Fuel: 250 kg.
Contingency %26
final reserve fuel:1 300 kg.
Alternate Fuel: 1 100 kg.
The maximum traffic load that can be carried is:
A: 19 200 kg
B: 19 100 kg
C: 17 840 kg
D: 19 500 kg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: C

For the purpose of completing the Mass and Balance documentation, the Dry Operating Mass is defined as:

A: The total mass of the aircraft ready for a specific type of operation excluding crew and crew baggage.
B: The total mass of the aircraft ready for a specific type of operation excluding all usable fuel.
C: The total mass of the aircraft ready for a specific type of operation excluding all traffic load.
D: The total mass of the aircraft ready for a specific type of operation excluding all usable fuel and traffic load.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: D

Which of the following statements is correct?

A: A tail heavy aeroplane is less stable and stalls at a lower speed than a nose heavy aeroplane
B: The station (STA) is always the location of the centre of gravity in relation to a reference point, normally the leading edge of the wing at MAC
C: The centre of gravity is given in percent of MAC calculated from the leading edge of the wing, where MAC always = the wing chord halfway between the centre line of the fuselage and the wing tip
D: If the actual centre of gravity is located behind the aft limit the aeroplane longitudinal stability increases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer: A